Learning to Sprout

Our Original Sprouting Blend (top-right, 3 days growth) with a variety of other sprouts.

Our Original Sprouting Blend (top-right, 3 days growth) with a variety of other sprouts.

Sprouting really is a simple process that’s easy to learn.  However, most people get into trouble by trying to learn about sprouting from the information on websites. The reason this creates problems is that these websites are describing the sprouting method the works for them and where they live.  Even if you happened to live right across the street from one of these people, the fact that they sprout in a north facing window and your kitchen window faces south would mean the difference between their sprouting success and your failure.

In order to be successful there are two things to know.  First, you must learn to sprout using a method that is compatible with where you live. And second, you must use quality, well formulated ingredients.

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Sprouting Basics

There are four basic elements that everyone uses to sprout.  1. A sprouting blend.  2. A sprouting container.  3. Water.  And  4. Directions that teach you how to sprout – sprouting knowledge.

The factors you consider when selecting these four elements will determine if you grow a jar of fresh, healthful, delicious sprouts or create a foul moldy mess that must be discarded.   Each of these fours areas is equally important.  If you choose poorly in one area, your attempts will fail.

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Making Wise Choices

When I describe choices as being wise – I am referring to having you make selections that will result in your success.  I want you to achieve positive results in sprouting and in caring for your birds that is comparable to the results my clients receive and that I experience with the parrots and other birds under my care.

1.  The Sprouting Blend.  Nearly all other sprouting blends I see available for sale on-line are not formulated so the blend will grow for at least three days.  This three day growing period assures optimal nutrition in the sprouts.  There are several pages on this website that discuss the merits of the sprouting blends I’ve created. I’ll list a few links to these articles here for your convenience.

Soaked vs Sprouted Seed

Nutrients in Our Sprouting Blends

Features and Benefits of Our Sprouting Blends

2. The Sprouting Container. I prefer recycling which is why I use glass jars for sprouting.  Glass jars can also be well cleaned and sterilized if necessary.  They come in a variety of sizes and shapes and best of all – they’re free.  Everyone eats food from glass jars.  Larger, half-gallon to gallon sized jars, can be purchased at the thrift store for around $2.  I opt for glass jars over the plastic sprouting containers because plastic dries, cracks and breaks.  If you need a sprouting container larger than a gallon, this is discussed in my book.  Plastic sprouting containers are made from nonrenewable resources and most communities don’t have the ability to recycle them.  And those expensive ($200+/-) sprouting machines .. . I can’t relate to using them, or to their virtues: moving parts that require maintenance, repair and electricity.

"The Complete Guide to Successful Sprouting for Parrots".

"The Complete Guide to Successful Sprouting for Parrots".

3. The Water you use when sprouting is an important element to ensuring your success.  This is why I devote a considerable amount of space to this topic in my book,  “The Complete Guide to Successful Sprouting for Parrots”.  Many sprouting attempts fail because of poor quality water.

4. The Directions. You must learn to sprout using a method that is compatible with the climate and other variables where you live.  A few of these fluctuating conditions include – temperature, humidity (or lack of it), water quality, amount of light,  and the time of year (the season) all effect your ability to sprout.

Chapter 3 in my book teaches you how to work with these variables in your home or aviary.  Then sprouting quickly becomes a simple practice.  Something  that you flow through as effortlessly as getting your first cup of coffee or tea in the morning.

After you have your properly grown, delicious sprouts, chapter 4 in my book teaches you how to care for them. To keep your sprouts fresh as you use them  they have simple yet specific needs. And chapter 5 offers you a variety of suggestions in being successful when introducing them to your flock.

The Complete Sprouting Kit - everything you need to succeed.

The Complete Sprouting Kit - everything you need to succeed.

If you’re new to sprouting, you need the only book specifically written about sprouting for parrots and other birds, “The Complete Guide to Successful Sprouting for Parrots”.

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And your success is ensured with our Complete Sprouting Kit. BUY NOW.

The Complete Sprouting Kit contains either a one or five pound bag of our sprouting blend, a 2 oz. bottle of GSE (grapefruit seed extract) and a copy of  “The Complete Guide to Successful Sprouting for Parrots”.

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Please let me know if this article was helpful.

And, if you have a question or comment about something not covered in my book, please let me know. That’s what these pages on Sprouting Q & A’s are for.

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One Response to “Learning to Sprout”

  1. […] book, The Complete Guide to Successful Sprouting for Parrots. Problem solved. The trick is to learn to sprout for where you live. Then, she discovered that the sprouting blends (Best bird Food Ever!) that Leslie puts together […]

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